HOMELESSNESS

Homeless Shelters

Welcome to our Cary, North Carolina Homeless Shelters and Services for the needy page. Below are all of the homeless shelters and services for the needy that provide help to those in need for Cary, NC and surrounding cities.

We also provide other homeless resources such as transitional resources for the homeless. Homeless clinic and treatment center resources are also provided on the right navigational bar.

Many shelters also provide services such as alcohol and drug rehab treatment along with clinics. I try to provide as much information as possible on my details pages.


Wrenn House

Raleigh, NC 27603
8.13 miles from city center Cary
919-832-7866
Wrenn House is the only homeless/runaway/crisis intervention program and shelter for youth in the Triangle. Wrenn House provides a safe, legal and responsible environment for youth who run away from home, who are homeless, or are otherwise in a crisis situation. Wrenn House is open 24 hours a day, 3

Meet Me at the Bridge

Raleigh, NC 27601
9.21 miles from city center Cary
919-210-8504
We comb the streets for the poor and needy, assess their felt needs and minister to them in every way we can. We gather them in various places, serve a hot meal, give them clothing, shoes, blankets, sleeping bags, etc. and share Christ with them in a loving and respectful way.

Raleigh Rescue Mission

Raleigh, NC 27611
9.29 miles from city center Cary
(919)828-9014

The Mission serves people in the community in many ways, including: Emergency Overnight Services for women and children and single men
Life-changing Recovery and Rehabilitation for men and women Adult Education Center (GED preparation).

Durham Rescue Mission

Durham, NC 27701
15.22 miles from city center Cary
(919) 688-9641
The Durham Rescue Mission provides food, shelter and other programs and services to the homeless men of Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill through our men’s program.

Urban Ministries of Durham Inc.

Durham, NC 27702
15.78 miles from city center Cary
(919) 682-0538
Emergency Shelter.Direct Substance Abuse Services.
Shelter Journey Programs
UMD’s Community Shelter has 81 beds for men, 30 for women and nine family rooms with a total of 38 beds for parents and their children, for a total of 149 beds. There are also 25 overflow mats that supplement the beds.

Genesis Home

Durham, NC 27702
15.85 miles from city center Cary
9196835878 ext 22
Genesis Home works to end homelessness for families with children and for young adults by providing housing and supportive services to foster independence.

Family Temporary Program

Durham, NC
15.86 miles from city center Cary
919-408-1689
We offer service for family in Emergency needs at risk we help single adults, Runaway Youth, Family with children. We are a transitional housing program that provides assistance to families and single women. We offer specific help with helping them make it to the next step to finding a permanent home.

Family Temporary Shelter Program

Durham , NC 27701
16.38 miles from city center Cary
919 885-2331
Family Temporary shelter is a Program that help those that are at Risk of emergancy shelter and those that are at risk - of becomung homeless, we are in the process of getting space for family and location for family with children and indiviual, we are only taking wating list until further notice.

Durham Rescue Mission Shelter For Women - Good Samaritan Inn

Durham, NC 27701
16.89 miles from city center Cary
At the Durham Rescue Mission, we offer safe shelter, three meals a day, clean clothing, Biblical counseling, financial planning, vocational training, GED/education and employment assistance to help the homeless in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area get back on their feet.

Community House

Chapel Hill, NC 27516
17.14 miles from city center Cary
919 967-0643
Provides a 24 hour Residential Facility for Homeless Men. Community House offers safe living accommodations, meals, showers and laundry facilities. Community House guests also receive an array of services:  referrals to substance abuse education and counseling; medical and mental health.

HomeStart

Chapel Hill, NC 27516
19.06 miles from city center Cary
919 932-6025

HomeStart provides emergency and longer-term housing and services to 50 homeless women and children at a time, on land provided by Orange County. 110 women and 60 children stayed at HomeStart during the 2009-10 fiscal year, and 10,076 meals were served.

Please contact us if you are in need of transportation to one of these shelters. 919.999.7990

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

YOU ARE STRONG

YOU ARE WORTHY

YOU ARE ABLE

YOU ARE NOT ALONE

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IT'S NOT OKAY... YOU ARE WORTHY!

Help for Abuse and Battered women

Getting out of an abusive or violent relationship isn’t easy. Maybe you’re still hoping that things will change or you’re afraid of what your partner will do if he discovers you’re trying to leave. Whatever your reasons, you probably feel trapped and helpless. But help is available. There are many resources available for abused and battered women, including crisis hotlines, shelters—even job training, legal services, and childcare. You deserve to live free of fear. Start by reaching out.

How can you get out of an abusive relationship?

Why doesn’t she just leave? It’s the question many people ask when they learn that a woman is being battered and abused. But if you are in an abusive relationship, you know that it’s not that simple. Ending an important relationship is never easy. It’s even harder when you’ve been isolated from your family and friends, psychologically beaten down, financially controlled, and physically threatened.

If you’re trying to decide whether to stay or leave, you may be feeling confused, uncertain, frightened, and torn. One moment, you may desperately want to get away, and the next, you may want to hang on to the relationship. Maybe you even blame yourself for the abuse or feel weak and embarrassed because you’ve stuck around in spite of it. Don’t be trapped by confusion, guilt, or self-blame. The only thing that matters is your safety.

If you are being abused, remember:

  • You are not to blame for being battered or mistreated.
  • You are not the cause of your partner’s abusive behavior.
  • You deserve to be treated with respect.
  • You deserve a safe and happy life.
  • Your children deserve a safe and happy life.
  • You are not alone. There are people waiting to help.

Making the decision to leave

As you face the decision to either end the abusive relationship or try to save it, keep the following things in mind:

If you’re hoping your abusive partner will change... The abuse will probably happen again. Abusers have deep emotional and psychological problems. While change is not impossible, it isn’t quick or easy. And change can only happen once your abuser takes full responsibility for his behavior, seeks professional treatment, and stops blaming you, his unhappy childhood, stress, work, his drinking, or his temper.

If you believe you can help your abuser... It’s only natural that you want to help your partner. You may think you’re the only one who understands him or that it’s your responsibility to fix his problems. But the truth is that by staying and accepting repeated abuse, you’re reinforcing and enabling the abusive behavior. Instead of helping your abuser, you’re perpetuating the problem.

If your partner has promised to stop the abuse... When facing consequences, abusers often plead for another chance, beg for forgiveness, and promise to change. They may even mean what they say in the moment, but their true goal is to stay in control and keep you from leaving. But most of the time, they quickly return to their abusive behavior once they’ve been forgiven and they’re no longer worried that you’ll leave.

If your partner is in counseling or a program for batterers... Even if your partner is in counseling, there is no guarantee that he’ll change. Many abusers who go through counseling continue to be violent, abusive, and controlling. If your partner has stopped minimizing the problem or making excuses, that’s a good sign. But you still need to make your decision based on who he is now, not the man you hope he will become.

If you’re worried about what will happen if you leave... You may be afraid of what your abusive partner will do, where you’ll go, or how you’ll support yourself or your children. But don’t let fear of the unknown keep you in a dangerous, unhealthy situation.

Signs that your abuser is NOT changing:

  • He minimizes the abuse or denies how serious it really was.
  • He continues to blame others for his behavior.
  • He claims that you’re the one who is abusive.
  • He pressures you to go to couple’s counseling.
  • He tells you that you owe him another chance.
  • You have to push him to stay in treatment.
  • He says that he can’t change unless you stay with him and support him.
  • He tries to get sympathy from you, your children, or your family and friends.
  • He expects something from you in exchange for getting help.
  • He pressures you to make decisions about the relationship.

Safety planning

Whether or not you’re ready to leave your abuser, there are things you can do to protect yourself. These safety tips can make the difference between being severely injured or killed and escaping with your life.

Prepare for emergencies

Know your abuser’s red flags. Be on alert for signs and clues that your abuser is getting upset and may explode in anger or violence. Come up with several believable reasons you can use to leave the house (both during the day and at night) if you sense trouble brewing.

Identify safe areas of the house. Know where to go if your abuser attacks or an argument starts. Avoid small, enclosed spaces without exits (such as closets or bathrooms) or rooms with weapons (such as the kitchen). If possible, head for a room with a phone and an outside door or window.

Come up with a code word. Establish a word, phrase, or signal you can use to let your children, friends, neighbors, or co-workers know that you’re in danger and the police should be called.

Make an escape plan

Be ready to leave at a moment’s notice. Keep the car fueled up and facing the driveway exit, with the driver’s door unlocked. Hide a spare car key where you can get it quickly. Have emergency cash, clothing, and important phone numbers and documents stashed in a safe place (at a friend’s house, for example).

Practice escaping quickly and safely. Rehearse your escape plan so you know exactly what to do if under attack from your abuser. If you have children, have them practice the escape plan also.

Make and memorize a list of emergency contacts. Ask several trusted individuals if you can contact them if you need a ride, a place to stay, or help contacting the police. Memorize the numbers of your emergency contacts, local shelter, and domestic violence hotline.

If you stay

If you decide at this time to stay with your abusive partner, there are some things you can try to make your situation better and to protect yourself and your children.

  • Contact the domestic violence/sexual assault program in your area. They can provide emotional support, peer counseling, safe emergency housing, information, and other services while you are in the relationship, as well as if you decide to leave.
  • Build as strong a support system as your partner will allow. Whenever possible, get involved with people and activities outside your home and encourage your children to do so.
  • Be kind to yourself! Develop a positive way of looking at yourself and talking to yourself. Use affirmations to counter the negative comments you get from the abuser. Allow yourself time for doing things you enjoy.

Source: Breaking the Silence Handbook

Resources and references

Help for abused and battered women

Domestic Violence: Finding Safety & Support (PDF) – Guide for abused and battered women offers advice on getting safe, using the police or the courts, and finding support. (New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence)

Breaking the Silence Handbook (PDF) – Help and advice for abused and battered women, including legal options. (Nebraska Health and Human Services)

Domestic violence hotlines

National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or 1-800-787-3224 (TTY) – A crisis intervention and referral phone line for domestic violence. Hotline staff access to translators for other languages. (National Domestic Violence Hotline)

State Coalition List – Lists the phone numbers for the state offices of the NCADV. These offices can help you find local support or a shelter from domestic violence, as well as free or low-cost legal services. (National Coalition Against Domestic Violence)

Domestic Violence Resources Directory – Lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. (Dating Advice)

Domestic violence shelters and support

Tour a Domestic Violence Shelter – Find out what you can expect at a typical women’s refuge or shelter and hear personal experiences of what life there is like. (Safe Horizon)